Welcoming Resources Administration

Displaying 1 - 17 of 17

 Title  YR Summary / Description Type Created
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Schools & Youth Community Events01/03/22
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01/03/22
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Schools & Youth Community Events01/03/22
Bridging Differences Playbook-Link2021Feature Photo

As part of the Bridging Differences initiative at the University of California at Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, this playbook synthesizes the core skills and strategies for bridging political, racial, religious, and other divides to support positive dialogue, relationships, and understanding between groups or individuals. Welcoming America is cited on page 36 as an example of how to put the skill of seeking and promoting counter-stereotypical information into practice.

  • Guide
Equity & Inclusion Business Alliance12/13/21
Resources for Moving Towards a Welcoming and Inclusive ChurchesLinkFeature Photo

This website offers a truly comprehensive, ecumenical, and global set of resources for any congregation wising to welcome and support their LGBTQ neighbors. It , including guides, training materials, links, and directories.

Denominational representatives of the Welcoming Church Movement created IWR in November 2002. The purpose of this ecumenical group is to provide the resources to facilitate a paradigm shift in multiple denominations whereby churches become welcoming and affirming of all congregants regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity. IWR wants to help build church homes that are truly welcoming and nurturing, where everyone knows “they're okay, just like they are.” In early 2006, IWR became a program of the National LGBTQ Task Force, through a formal merger.  IWR's vision is that of its sponsors, the welcoming church programs. The task assigned to IWR is to provide or assist in the production of resources to make possible this paradigm shift in Christianity.

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Faith & Spirit 12/13/21
Inclusive Services for LGBT Older Adults: A Practical Guide to Creating Welcoming AgenciesLink2020Feature Photo

First published in March of 2012 and updated May 18, 2020 - This publication helps to answers the question: “How can our mainstream aging organization provide inclusive and welcoming services to older lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender adults?” Written with suggestions, tips and practical ideas from mainstream aging providers in the field, along with SAGE and the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging’s partners.

  • Guide
Seniors & Retirees Generation Plus12/13/21
[York County] Business Leaders Say Employers Need Welcoming Workplaces to ThriveLink2021

As the economy recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, getting sidelined workers back into the workforce is a priority. But, as the U.S. population becomes more diverse, some say increasing diversity in the workplace is a matter of survival.  In York County, the Welcoming Workplaces initiative is designed to help employers prioritize inclusion in their workforce to make both the community and businesses stronger.  This article describes their efforts.

The Welcoming Workplaces initiative is a collaboration between the Confronting Racism Coalition and the York County Economic Alliance. Welcoming Workplaces includes best practices for businesses as well as a resource library with guides and tips on how to help increase diversity in workplaces.

Equity & Inclusion Business Alliance12/13/21
Hidden Tribes: A Study of America's Polarized LandscapeLink2018

America has never felt so divided. Bitter debates that were once confined to Congressional hearings and cable TV have now found their way into every part of our lives, from our Facebook feeds to the family dinner table. But most Americans are tired of this "us-versus-them" mindset and are eager to find common ground. This is the message we’ve heard from more than 8,000 Americans in one of our country’s largest-ever studies of polarization: We hold dissimilar views on many issues. However, more than three in four Americans also believe that our differences aren’t so great that we can’t work together.

Our research concludes that we have become a set of tribes, with different codes, values, and even facts. In our public debates, it seems that we no longer just disagree. We reject each other’s premises and doubt each other’s motives. We question each other’s character. We block our ears to diverse perspectives. At home, polarization is souring personal relationships, ruining Thanksgiving dinners, and driving families apart.

We are experiencing these divisions in our workplaces, neighborhood groups, even our places of worship. In the media, pundits score points, mock opponents, and talk over each other. On the Internet, social media has become a hotbed of outrage, takedowns, and cruelty—often targeting total strangers.

But this can change. A majority of Americans, whom we’ve called the "Exhausted Majority," are fed up by America’s polarization. They know we have more in common than that which divides us: our belief in freedom, equality, and the pursuit of the American dream. They share a deep sense of gratitude that they are citizens of the United States. They want to move past our differences.

Turning the tide of tribalism is possible―but it won’t be easy. Americans have real differences and real disagreements with each other. We must be able to listen to each other to understand those differences and find common ground. That’s the focus of the Hidden Tribes project: to understand better what is pulling us apart, and find what can bring us back together.

The report that you can download here is the first part of More in Common's year-long Hidden Tribes project to understand our polarization and study what can reunite our fractured communities.  Full Summary at: https://hiddentribes.us/.

Government & Community 12/13/21
Bridging Divides, Creating Community: Arts, Culture, and ImmigrationLink2020

Bridging Divides, Creating Community: Arts, Culture, and Immigration is a creative placemaking field scan written by John C. Arroyo, Ph.D., AICP, in partnership with ArtPlace America. This field scan seeks to illuminate key priorities within the immigration sector and provide a framework for understanding the ways that arts and culture contribute to local, place-based immigration related outcomes. It is intended for artists and other arts and cultural stakeholders seeking to better understand and collaborate with a particular community development sector, as well as community development practitioners, policymakers, and funders who are interested in how arts and culture partners might further their work.

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12/13/21
Welcoming America Social Cohesion Series-Link2019

Welcoming America’s series of articles on social cohesion explores what Welcoming America and other national- and local-level thought leaders and practitioners have learned about engaging long-term members of receiving communities to advance immigrant inclusion and build stronger, more cohesive communities.

Released in conjunction with Welcoming America’s 10-year anniversary, this social cohesion series updates the 2011 Receiving Communities Toolkit and examines innovations in contact building, leadership engagement, and positive communications to foster greater belonging for all:

  1. Building Cohesive Communities in an Era of Migration and Change
  2. Engaging Local Leaders to Foster Welcoming Communities
  3. Innovations in Building Meaningful Contact Across Difference

Building Cohesive Communities in an Era of Migration and Change is an update to the 2011 Receiving Communities Toolkit and explores the nature of today’s challenge, strategies to address divides, and recommendations for bringing social cohesion work to scale.

This is the third in a series of articles on social cohesion that explores what Welcoming America and other national- and local-level thought leaders and practitioners have learned about engaging long-term members of receiving communities in order to advance immigrant inclusion and build stronger, more cohesive communities.

“Engaging Local Leaders to Foster Welcoming Communities” focuses on how leaders – in government, nonprofits, civil society – set the tone for welcome and belonging in the community. Reinforcing social bonds requires leadership engagement, positive communications, and building meaningful contact across difference.

This is the second in a series of articles on social cohesion that explores what Welcoming America and other national- and local-level thought leaders and practitioners have learned about engaging long-term members of receiving communities in order to advance immigrant inclusion and build stronger, more cohesive communities.

“Innovations in Building Meaningful Contact Across Difference” explores innovative models that bring people together across difference and provides a set of examples and recommendations for making contact building more effective and expansive.

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Government & Community 12/13/21
Tips to Build & Sustain a Locally Welcoming InfrastructureLink2021

Following the U.S. government’s departure from Afghanistan in August 2021, Welcoming America and a cadre of partners created this toolkit for community leaders managing arrivals of Afghan refugees. It offers four key tips to creating an equitable and welcoming environment, including mobilizing a multi-sector response group; creating a We Welcome Fund; sharing messages of welcome; and changing policy at the federal, state, and local levels.

This toolkit was created in partnership with the National Partnership for New AmericansCities for ActionCities for CitizenshipRefugee Advocacy Lab, and We Are All America.

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12/13/21
Unique Mental Health Challenges for the LGBTQI CommunityLinkFeature Photo

This guide includes three sections: 1. mental health risk factors unique to members of the LGBTQI community; 2. How to find the right mental health professional; 3. A list of LGBTQI mental health resources.

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Gender & Identity, Health & Wellness 10/22/21
How can Family Therapy Help Transgender Clients?LinkFeature Photo

A guide and directory targeted at families with a family member who considers themselves transgender. The guide provides a general overview and lists a variety of books and resources.  It also includes a link to a family therapist search tool. [NOTE: The AAMFT 's code of ethics explicitly addresses non-discrimination based on gender identity. The search tool listed 23 family therapists within 50 miles of Asheville, NC.

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Gender & Identity, Family & Friends 10/22/21
Trans Legal Services Network DirectoryLinkFeature Photo

Trans Legal Services Network members represent over 80 organizations across the country dedicated to providing name and gender change services or other legal services for trans people in their areas. (As of September 2021, 3 are listed in North Carolina, none of these in Western North Carolina.)

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Gender & Identity 10/22/21
Getting Your Health Care Covered: a Guide for Transgender PeopleLinkFeature Photo

Use this guide to help you navigate the coverage process.  This guide will be especially useful for people who have Medicaid or private insurance. If you are on Medicare, in the military, or a veteran who receives services through the VA, make sure to check out NCTE's specific resources for these plans: Medicare; Veterans & Military

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Gender & Identity, Health & Wellness 10/22/21
Changing Your Legal Documents in North CarolinaLink2021Feature Photo

Find out how to update your name and gender on state and federal IDs and records.  This page includes instructions, applications, and links for changing your legal name, driver's license, and birth certificate in North Carolina.   For guidance on changing your passport, visit Know Your Rights: Passports. Other useful Know our Rights guides for transgender people cover: Selective Service | Social Security.

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Gender & Identity 10/22/21
Online Therapy Resources for the LGBTQ+ CommunityLink2021Feature Photo

The following guide provides an overview of how therapy supports members of the LGBTQ+ community and links to resources that can be helpful for navigating the coming-out process, strengthening your relationships, and learning how to be true to yourself as an LGBTQ+ individual.  NOTE FROM BRPC: This is a commercial web site.  The provider may receive a commission if you decide to use counseling services through links on this site.  For more information about the provider, see About OnlineTherapy.com. They are affiliated with Better Help, a major platform and professional network used for delivering online therapy.

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Health & Wellness 07/02/21
 Title  YR Summary / Description Type Created
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Mental Health Providers

Eric Davis  MS, LCPA, NCC, Counselor

Willow Wellness and Recovery, PC 9 All Souls Crescent  Suite B, Asheville, North Carolina 28803  Phone: (828) 490-4137 | Website I am a firm believer in empowerment and self-determination. In the past, I have worked well with folks experiencing a range of issues, such as anxiety, depression, substance-use, sleep disturbances, relationship issues, and issues unique to the LGBT community.

Scott Thomas,  Licensed Professional Counselor, MA, LPC, LCAS

Silver Lining Therapy 70 Woodfin Place  STE 21, Asheville, North Carolina 28801  Phone: (828) 705-3084 | Website I believe humor can be a powerful tool for healing and seek to incorporate this into our time together. Unique to my practice is an approach that truly puts you at the center of the counseling experience, and I draw from a wide variety of techniques to help you see and experience real change in your life. To see if therapy might be a good fit, I offer free phone consultations.

James Harrison, PhD Psychologist

12 Westridge Dr , Asheville, North Carolina 28803  Phone: (828) 348-6300 | Website I enjoy helping people achieve physical and emotional intimacy whether they are young or old, straight or gay, in healthy, responsible, and mutually affirming ways. I also enjoy helping people improve their earning and manage their assets. And I like working with older people. I offer free phone consultations.

Judy Maris, Counselor, LPC, LCPC, MA, MS

Maris Psychotherapy 41 Clayton St, Suite 301, Asheville, North Carolina 28801  Phone: (828) 537-4489 | Website We can explore troublesome patterns that tend to repeat themselves in your life or look at new issues that have just come up. The important thing is for us to work together to get to the bottom of your difficulties and resolve them. I will assist you in becoming more aware of what you are feeling and thinking in the present moment. The untapped wisdom within you is a powerful healing force. Let me help you gain access to your full inner resources. I offer free phone consultations.

Elizabeth Heaney, Counselor, MA, LPC 

166 E Chestnut Street, Asheville, North Carolina 28801  Phone: (520) 447-3319 | Website I work with individual adults with concerns like: family history issues, relationship concerns, life satisfaction issues (related to jobs, living situations or relationships), anxiety and depression. I’ve had a particular focus on working with couples, addressing every aspect of relationship challenges – relationship dissatisfaction/boredom, affairs, sexual/intimacy issues, etc. And I was a civilian counselor on military bases for several years, so I have a clear understanding of the unique pressures and challenges facing service members and families. I offer free phone consultations.

Siljoy Maurer

Holistic Perspectives P.O. Box 333, Enka, NC 2872  Phone: (828) 333-0103  | siljoy@me.com or  www.HolisticPerspectives.com For many years now I have been mentoring men and women from all walks of life. It continues to be my greatest joy to accompany someone from “just being ok” into thriving! As a Mentor & Healer I partner with my clients in creating authenticity, wellness and deep contentment, in whatever area of their lives they are seeking change. The combination of giving very practical, livable tools for direct “next steps” while “holding the big picture” and then manifesting that big picture often feels like this: a new client brings me their life or life situation in a jigsaw puzzle box, they lost the lid and forgot what the picture on it looked like. I am good at knowing that picture and then guiding my clients/mentees to put all the puzzle pieces together.  

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